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Ice Cube: Attitude

Posted Mar 31 2006

Information-wise, there are some useful things here as McIver brings together interviews and articles from numerous magazines and books without actually speaking to Ice Cube himself.

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Information-wise, there are some useful things here as McIver brings together interviews and articles from numerous magazines and books without actually speaking to Ice Cube himself. McGiver gives his interpretations and views, but for the most part, this is like one long press release celebrating Ice Cube as a “genius” and “prophet.” Granted, McIver does ask some of the tough questions, including Cube’s view on gender and race issues, as well as conflicts he has had with various peers. However, any critical comments come in the form of quotes from other sources and not McIver himself. From the beginning of the book, he makes it known that he is as a White male from London writing about a Black male from South Central Los Angeles, which is literally a world away. On one hand, he feels that his status as an outsider gives him enough distance to remain objective, but it quickly becomes clear that he misses some of the nuances of his subject matter. Three quick examples include misinterpreting Mexican American slang, crediting Ice Cube for writing a skit on The Predator album, which was actually an outtake from the movie American Me, and writing that Snoop Dogg’s roots “east of L.A.”, led to misunderstandings at the height of the “East Coast-West Coast conflict.” But as a whole, once you get past the constant adulation of Ice Cube, the story of his rise to fame and his contributions to hip hop and popular culture are quite interesting, not to mention quite significant.

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